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Jakarta Post
Skyscraper of waste: Greater Jakarta drowning in mountains of trash
City
Skyscraper of waste: Greater Jakarta drowning in mountains of trash

Do you ever count the amount of waste you produce? Greater Jakarta, with more than 30 million people, sends more than 14,000 tons of waste to eight landfills every day.

Lifestyle
Luxury goods: Spending in what really matters

At a certain point in life, one may consider acquiring branded goods for many reasons. For those who have seen the finer things in life, the desire to own a luxury item might naturally surface as they become accustomed to appreciating good craftsmanship, high quality materials and good designs, among other things.

City
Underprivileged millennials: Being young and poor in Jakarta

Millennials.All over the world, the term millennial – which Statistics Indonesia (BPS) defines as those born between 1980 and 2000 – elicits sighs and eye-rolls, conjuring up images of avocado toast, coworking spaces and hoverboards.

National
‘Don‘t let us fight by ourselves’: The women who fight to make Indonesia a safer place

In an alternate universe, you are anIndonesian woman who is sexually abusedby your husband.You’ve had enough.You want to run away and seek help. You decide to…

National
Wamena investigation: What the government is not telling us

In Wamena in Papua’s Jayawijaya regency there is a customary belief that women and children are innocent, that’s why the men have to protect them. “Humi yukurugi wene inyokodek,” said Dominikus Surabut, head of the customary council of La Pago. But if women and children become victims, he said, the men are going to fight in the afternoon and evening. “Inyawim hiam-hiam ninane uok...,” Dominikus went on.

National
Electoral dynamics and the rise-and-fall of parties

The country only recently held its general elections in April. This year’s political event, which saw for the first time the presidential election held simultaneously along with the multitier legislative elections, has had an impact on the results of the elections, including the sustainability of the political parties contesting them. The Jakarta Post’s Fachrul Sidiq, Ghina Ghaliya Quddus and Imanuddin Razak have analyzed and presented the facts in today’s Special Report.

National
Profit, connectivity and people’s right to fly

The rapid increase in the number of air passengers in the past few years has demanded a substantial increase in air transportation infrastructure such as airports, particularly those serving domestic routes and destinations. In response, the government has been ambitiously developing 15 new airports under the 2015-2019 national medium-term development program (RPJMN) and is planning to develop 12 more in the 2020- 2024 RPJMN. The Jakarta Post’s Riza Roidila Mufti, Fachrul Sidiq and Imanuddin Razak take a close look at the issue.

National
Seeking best ‘rooster’ for state leadership

Talks over the next state leadership have started to take up a significant portion of national media platforms, even though the presidential election was only less than three months ago, and the elected pair for the next five years has not even been inaugurated. Above all the widely tipped traits of an expected victorious candidate, young age is apparently the subject of the discourse. The Jakarta Post’s Fachrul Sidiq, Novan Iman Santosa, Imanuddin Razak and Semarang correspondent Suherdjoko take a closer look at the issue.

Lifestyle
Tastemakers from Jakarta’s good old days: A story of perseverance and keeping up with change

Long before skyscrapers become ubiquitous in Jakarta, the spirit of living life to the fullest has been apparent in certain corners of the capital. Individuals who live out their passion and are adept at spotting golden opportunities have become pioneers in establishing distinctive businesses, setting the standards for the lifestyle needs of Jakarta residents.

National
Tug of war over Komodo National Park

East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) Governor Viktor Bungtilu Laiskodat has on several occasions proposed for the temporary closure of Komodo National Park and eventual handover of its management to the provincial administration. The Jakarta Post’s correspondent, Markus Makur, takes a closer look at the issue and presents his findings in this Special Report.

National
Relocation limits mobility, job options

The Living-in Experience, an internship program for less fortunate residents of Greater Jakarta, is part of the Recruitment & Training System for young reporters of The Jakarta Post. Below are personal accounts of those who recently took part in the three-day-and-two-night internship programs in Kampung Akuarium, Penjaringan district, North Jakarta; in Klender, East Jakarta and in Marunda, North Jakarta. 

National
Shared misery in shadow of violence

The Living-in Experience, an internship program for less fortunate residents of Greater Jakarta, is part of the Recruitment & Training System for young reporters of The Jakarta Post. Below are personal accounts of those who recently took part in the three-day-and-two-night internship programs in Kampung Akuarium, Penjaringan district, North Jakarta; in Klender, East Jakarta and in Marunda, North Jakarta.

National
How quake caught Palu off guard

Former mayor Rusdy Mastura remains lost in thought about the great loss of human lives — 2,000 deaths and 5,000 missing souls — in the wake of the Sept. 28 quake in Central Sulawesi that devastated what was his area of jurisdiction, Palu.

National
Putting quakes on spatial maps

The 7.4-magnitude earthquake that wrought devastation in Central Sulawesi on Sept. 28 was a scientific prophecy that came true. Armed with evidence of similar catastrophes in the area more than a century ago, scientists had warned of a potential tectonic calamity years before the monstrous quake struck, triggering a tsunami and land liquefaction.

National
Caution greets ‘zero down payment’ housing program

Group reporting is a writing assignment for candidate journalists of The Jakarta Post. It is part and parcel of a two-month workshop organized for the Post’s cub reporters. A total of six candidates have completed their group reporting and writing assignments. The following are their journalistic products.

National
On garbage, Jakarta looks beyond landfills

Jakarta’s fury over the multi trillion rupiah in garbage disposal fees sought by its neighbor Bekasi should serve as a hard lesson to expedite the capital city’s overdue effort to reform its primitive, costly waste management system, which relies on a single landfill. Our reporters Vela Andapita and Safrin La Batu analyze the prospect of the modern waste treatment facilities Jakarta is soon to build.

National
Why is food self-sufficiency unachievable?

Governments have come and gone but none has managed to lead Indonesia, which once prided itself as an agrarian nation, to self-sufficiency in food as it has always aspired. It was only in 1984 under then-president Soeharto that Indonesia made the dream come true before it slid back into the jaws of insufficiency. Presidential candidates Joko “Jokowi” Widodo and Prabowo Subianto have both raised the contentious issue on their campaign trails. The Jakarta Post writers Safrin La Batu and Pandaya explore what stands in the way of the country’s effort to end its reliance on food imports.

National
Red tape hinders Lombok reconstruction

Still nursing the wounds from recent devastating quakes, West Nusa Tenggara (NTB) is rebuilding as tens of thousands of traumatized people are still living in shelters. However, it is feared that bureaucratic procedures that go along with the badly needed relief will hamper efforts to help the survivors rise from the rubble, The Jakarta Post correspondent in Mataram Panca Nugraha reports.

Food
Indonesians and instant noodles: A love affair

Since its introduction to the Indonesian public in 1968 with the brand “Supermie”, instant noodles have slowly but surely become a significant part of the Indonesian diet. It has been categorized as comfort food, even marketed as an occasional replacement for daily breakfast, lunch or dinner. The word "instant" no longer accurately applies in "emergency cases" such as when time or resources are limited.

National
German Muslims overcome sectarianism

A group of Indonesian journalists and scholars recently visited Germany at the invitation of the Goethe Institute Indonesia to obtain first-hand information about Muslim communities in the European country. The Jakarta Post’ writer Safrin La Batu explored the various expressions of Islam there as well as the challenges the communities face as a religious minority in a country that guarantees freedom of faith 

National
Saving maleo a mission possible

The maleo, a bird endemic to Sulawesi, is on the brink of extinction as a result of poaching and a shrinking habitat. The Jakarta Post’s correspondent in the Central Sulawesi provincial capital of Palu, Ruslan Sangadji, takes a closer look at how land conversion, egg theft and international support may make or break conservation efforts.

National
Freed hamlet riskily bolsters patriotism

Azerbaijan recently invited Indonesian journalists to the country for an update on the latest developments in international efforts to help resolve its territorial conflict with Armenians over Nagorno-Karabakh.The Jakarta Post’s Pandaya, who also interviewed Armenian diplomats in Jakarta, sees growing tensions as the peace negotiations that began in 1994 remain stalled.

National
The new media we know little about

Data breaches have become a contentious issue worldwide after Facebook, which has 137 million users in Indonesia, admitted that British political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica had harvested data of 80 million users. The Jakarta Post’s Safrin La Batu explores challenges and how the government will help protect citizens’ privacy online. 

National
Too much pesticide on plantations

Farms and plantations’ heavy dependence on pesticides is sounding an alarm on occupational safety in North Sumatra, one of Indonesia’s main oil palm producing regions. Some of the banned active chemical ingredients are widely available on the black market, while workers and farmers are ill-informed about the dangers of agricultural chemicals, reports The Jakarta Post’s local correspondent, Apriadi Gunawan.

Entertainment
The United States of ‘dangdut’: A struggle to ‘shake’ America

A melting pot of cultures, Indonesia is very fortunate to be blessed with a mix of Melayu, Indian, Arab, Chinese and European music, now known as dangdut. The popularity of the genre has reached far and wide; however, maybe not as far as the United States — or so one might think. 

National
Rabies in the land of dog-meat lovers

Since rabies was declared endemic to East Nusa Tenggara in 1997, there has been little progress in the provincial government’s efforts to eliminate the zoonotic  disease, as the virus remains a serious health issue today. Reporting from Maumere, The Jakarta Post contributing writer Djemi Amnifu explains how the local government’s neglect, combined with the locals’ appetite for dog meat, has contributed to the spread of the deadly disease. 

National
Slums transform overnight into tourist spots

Inspired by success stories in Yogyakarta and Malang, an increasing number of slum areas in major cities across Indonesia have transformed into new colorful quarters worthy of sightseeing.The Jakarta Post writers Corry Elyda in Jakarta and Aman Rochman in Malang take a closer look at how the trend is sparking a new social media craze.

National
Mentawais rise to save customary lands

The indigenous forest people of the remote Mentawai Islands, about 150 kilometers off the west coast of Sumatra in the Indian Ocean, are being pushed even further to the edge. They are powerless to defend their pristine forest, which a company has eyed for converting into a plantation. The Jakarta Post journalist Moses Ompusunggu recently visited Siberut, the largest of the three islands that make up the regency, and observed the native people’s struggle to protect their ancestral home.

National
How Sunda Wiwitan survives injustice

Followers of Sunda Wiwitan, one of the countless indigenous faiths in Indonesia, have survived colonial oppression and purges of non-official religions by the authoritarian New Order regime. The Jakarta Post writer Corry Elyda takes a look at how the small communities scattered across West Java and Banten provinces have stood the test of time.

National
LGBT people face uphill battle for rights

Indonesia’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community has been subjected to prejudice, hatred and physical attacks. Adding insult to injury, public officials and religious leaders have further exacerbated the situation with their politically charged anti-LGBT rhetoric. The latest challenge is the insistence by lawmakers on criminalizing same-sex relations. The Jakarta Post’s writer Safrin La Batu reports on how the marginalized group is putting up a fight for its rights.